1999 Hall of Fame Social Science and Humanities
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Jarvis "Jay" Edwin Seegmiller, M.D. (1920-) was born and reared in St. George, Utah. Valedictorian of the Dixie College Class of 1940, he then graduated with honors in chemistry from the University of Utah in 1942. His participation in a War Research Project shifted his interest to medical research and the National Institute of Health (NIH). After discharge from the army, he entered medical school and graduated with honors from the University of Chicago and interned at Johns Hopkins. He then returned to NIH and became Chief of Human Biochemical Genetics. In 1969, he became Professor for the Department of Medicine at the newly formed Medical School of the University of California, San Diego, and was appointed Founding Director of the Stein Institute for Research on Aging in 1983. Dr. Seegmiller received both a United States Public Health Distinguished Service Award and an International Geigy Rheumatism Prize in 1969. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for research at the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in 1982-83, was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1972 and the National Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1982. He has served on numerous Advisory Committees at the NIH and private organizations, is past President of the Western Association of Physicians (1979), and has authored over 350 scientific publications dealing with genetic defects that cause human disease. In 1950, he married Roberta Eads, who died of cancer in 1992. They have four children. In 1995, he married Barbara Ellertson.
Jarvis Seegmiller


Calvert Watson Whitehead, Ph.D. (1913-) was born and reared in St. George, Utah. Following his graduation from Dixie College, he received a BS degree in chemistry from Brigham Young University. While earning his bachelor degree, Calvert became very adept as a glass blower. Earnings from this talent paid tuition for his masters degree. In 1941, he was granted a teaching and research fellowship at the University of Nebraska. In 1944, Calvert was made a Junior Instructor of Chemistry. Finally, in 1955, he completed his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry at the University of Nebraska. A position was waiting for him at Eli Lilly and Company in Indianapolis, Indiana. He had the privilege of helping to develop penicillin for use in WWII. He synthesized two new drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. He discovered a new system for Pyrimidines. This system is now taught world wide as the Whitehead Synthesis. He has also contributed to many scientific publications and patents. In 1974, he retired from Eli Lilly as a Junior Executive and became a visiting fellow at Princeton University, and then enjoyed a professorship at the University of Utah from 1975-95. A new research laboratory at Snow Canyon Clinic will honor Dr. Whitehead and bear his name. Sixty-two years ago, Calvert married his sweetheart, Norma Law. They have three daughters and two sons.


Everard F. Cox, M.D. (1920-) was born in St. George and graduated from Dixie College in 1941. That same year he joined the Naval Aviation Cadet program and was commissioned a Naval Aviator in 1942. During a year of combat flying in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean, he was credited with destroying nine Japanese aircraft and a direct hit on a Japanese heavy cruiser. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal and nine Battle Stars on the Asiatic Pacific ribbon. Following WWII, he returned home and was recognized as the Outstanding Science Student at Dixie College in 1948. After earning a BS from the University of Utah in 1951, he entered the University of Maryland Medical School. He was class president and president of the Rush Honor Society. He returned to the Navy for internship and received a second Navy commission in the Medical Corps. Upon completion of a surgical residency program at the University of Maryland (1960), he became a Senior Surgeon at the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. During his professional career, he was Professor of Surgery at the University of Maryland, Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas and the University of Miami in Florida as well as Director of Surgery at the Maryland Institute of Emergency Medicine. He has been awarded three U.S. Patents for a medical device he created. He married his childhood sweetheart, Lela Sullivan, in 1942 and they are the parents of two sons, both surgeons, and three daughters.
Everard F. Cox


Dr. Gregory A. Prince (1948-) was born and reared in Los Angeles, California. He attended Dixie College from 1965-67, graduating as valedictorian. He attended the UCLA School of Dentistry from 1969-73, again graduating as valedictorian. He received a Ph.D. in Pathology from UCLA in 1975, studying respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the primary cause of infant pneumonia worldwide. Over a period of fifteen years at the National Institutes of Health and Johns Hopkins University, he and his co-workers developed the thesis that RSV disease could be prevented by administering antiviral antibodies to high-risk infants. He co-founded Virion Systems, Inc. to commercialize this thesis, and serves as its President and CEO. In 1989, Virion Systems and MedImmune, Inc. formed a joint venture to conduct clinical trials that ultimately resulted in the licensure by the Food and Drug Administration of RespiGam™ (1996), and Synagis™ (1998) for the prevention of RSV pneumonia in high-risk infants. Synagis™ is the first monoclonal antibody ever licensed for use against any infectious agent and its first-year sales made it one of the most successful biotech product launches in history. In addition to a career in science, Dr. Prince has developed an avocation as a historian. His first book, Power From on High: The Development of Mormon Priesthood, was published in 1995, and he is currently writing a biography of LDS Church President David O. McKay. He and his wife, JaLynn Rasmussen Prince, are the parents of three children.
Dr. Gregory A. Prince


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